Health news
Health news top Health news

   Login  |  Register    
Health News Make AMN Your Home PageDiscussion BoardsAdvanced Search ToolMedical RSS/XML News FeedHealth news
  You are here : Health.am > Health Centers > Cancer Health CenterPancreatic Cancer news

Researchers ID Gene Involved in Pancreatic Cancer

Pancreatic Cancer newsMar 03, 2009

Researchers from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center have identified a gene that is overexpressed in 90 percent of pancreatic cancers, the most deadly type of cancer.

Expression of the gene, Ataxia Telangiectasia Group D Complementing gene, called ATDC, is on average 20 times higher in pancreatic cancer cells than in cells from a normal pancreas. What’s more, the gene appears to make pancreatic cancer cells resistant to current therapies.

“One of the challenges in pancreatic cancer is that it is biologically aggressive and it does not respond well to chemotherapy or radiation. We found that ATDC not only causes the cancer cells to grow faster and be more aggressive, but it also makes the cancer cells particularly resistant to chemotherapy and radiation. By targeting this gene, we may be able to make cancer cells more sensitive to the therapies we already have in hand,” says senior study author Diane Simeone, M.D., director of the Multidisciplinary Pancreatic Cancer Clinic at the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Results of the study appear in the March issue of Cancer Cell.

The researchers injected into mice tumor cells expressing ATDC and compared that to a separate group of mice injected with tumor cells in which ATDC was suppressed. In the ATDC-expressing group, tumors grew in all the samples and were significantly larger and starting to metastasize, or spread. In the group in which ATDC was not expressed, only minimal signs of tumor growth were seen after 60 days.

“This particular gene promotes the biologic aggressiveness of the cancer,” says Simeone, who is also Lazar J. Greenfield Professor of Surgery and Molecular & Integrative Physiology at the U-M Medical School.

Dr. Diane Simeone discusses new research on the gene ATDC, which is overexpressed in 90 percent of <a rel=pancreatic cancers" />In addition, the researchers found that ATDC is most highly expressed at the point when pre-cancerous cells become malignant. ATDC was also linked to increased levels of a signaling protein called beta-catenin, which is known to play a key role in cancer development.

Researchers believe ATDC has potential as a target for developing future therapies. It could also help doctors determine when a patient has pancreatic cancer and when it’s chronic pancreatitis, a diagnosis that’s often difficult to make without surgery. In some cases, this may allow patients to avoid an operation.

ATDC also appears to be involved in other cancer types, including bladder cancer and lung cancer. Researchers are continuing to investigate its role. This research was done in the laboratory. No tests or therapies related to ATDC are available at this time.

Pancreatic cancer statistics: 37,680 Americans will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer this year and 34,290 will die from the disease, according to the American Cancer Society

Additional authors: Lidong Wang, David G. Heidt, Cheong J. Lee, Huibin Yang, Eric R. Fearon and Mats Ljungman from U-M; Craig D. Logsdon from M.D. Anderson Cancer Center; and Lizhi Zhang from the Mayo Clinic.

Funding: National Institutes of Health, Lustgarten Foundation

Reference: Cancer Cell, Vol. 15, Issue 3

Resources:
U-M Cancer AnswerLine, 800-865-1125

Source: University of Michigan Health System

Provided by ArmMed Media

Email this to a friend Bookmark this! Printable Version

RELATED STORIES:


 Comments [ + Post Your Own

Now you're in the public comment zone. What follows is not Armenian Medical Network's stuff; it comes from other people and we don't vouch for it. A reminder: By using this Web site you agree to accept our Terms of Service. Click here to read the Rules of Engagement.

There are no comments for this entry yet. [ + Comment here + ]




We are pleased to let readers post comments about an article. Please increase the credibility of your post by including your full name and email.

All comments are reviewed by our editors before they are posted on the site. Just keep it clean, kids.

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

Please enter the word you see in the image below:


   [advanced search]   
Interactive Quiz:
1. An infant who sits with only minimal support, attempts to attain a toy beyond reach, and rolls over from the supine to the prone position, but does not have a pincer grasp, is at a developmental level of
2 months
4 months
6 months
9 months
1 year



Health Centers

  Head and Neck Cancer

  Esophageal Cancer

  Benign Esophageal Tumors

  Cancer of the larynx

  Salivary Gland Tumors

  Cancer of the Hypopharynx

  Cancer of the Oropharynx

  Cancer of the Oral Cavity

  Cancer of the Nasal Cavity

  Head and Neck Cancer
      (- for profesionals -)


  Gynecologic cancers

  Cervical cancer

  Endometrial Cancer

  Fallopian Tube Cancer

  Ovarian Cancer

  Vaginal cancer

  Vulvar Cancer

  Ureteral & Renal Pelvic
  Cancers


  Uterine Cancer

  Gestational Trophoblastic
  Neoplasia


  Bladder cancer

  Breast cancer

  Colorectal Cancer

  Carcinoma of the Anus

  Anal Cancer Management

  Hodgkin's lymphoma

  Kaposi's sarcoma

  Kidney cancer

  Laryngeal cancer

  Liver cancer

  Lung cancer

  Lung cancer non small cell

  Lung cancer - small cell

  Oral cancer

  Osteosarcoma

  Cancer of the Penis

  Prostate cancer

  Skin cancer

  Stomach cancer

  Testicular cancer

» » »

Health Centers





Diabetes









Health news
  


Health Encyclopedia

Diseases & Conditions

Drugs & Medications

Health Tools

Health Tools



   Health newsletter

  





   Medical Links



   RSS/XML News Feed



   Feedback






Add to Google Reader or Homepage
Cancer: Overview, Causes, Risk Factors, Treatment
Add to My AOL