Cutaneous skin tags

Alternative names
Skin tags; Acrochordons

Definition
Cutaneous skin tags is a skin condition involving small, generally benign skin growths.

Causes, incidence, and risk factors
Cutaneous tags are very common, generally benign skin growths that occur most often after midlife. They are tiny skin protrusions, and may have a small narrow stalk connecting the skin bump to the surface of the skin. They are usually painless and do not grow or change, except for occasional irritation from rubbing by clothing or other friction. Their origin is unknown.

Symptoms

     
  • Skin growth       o Usually very small, but sometimes half an inch long       o Located on the neck, armpits, trunk, body folds, or other areas       o May have a narrow stalk       o Usually skin-colored, occasionally darker

Signs and tests
Diagnosis is based primarily on the appearance of the skin growth.

Treatment
Treatment is usually not necessary unless the cutaneous tags are irritating or are cosmetically displeasing. The growths may be surgically removed, removed by freezing (cryotherapy), or electrically burning off (cautery).

Expectations (prognosis)
Cutaneous tags are generally benign and usually not bothersome. They may become irritated or be cosmetically displeasing. There is usually no regrowth or scar formation cutaneous tags are removed, although new growths may appear elsewhere on the body.

Complications
There are usually no complications. Occasionally, irritation and discomfort may occur. The skin tags may be cosmetically unsightly.

Calling your health care provider
Call your health care provider if cutaneous tags are present and you want them removed, or if the appearance of a cutaneous tag changes.

Johns Hopkins patient information

Last revised: December 3, 2012
by Gevorg A. Poghosian, Ph.D.

Medical Encyclopedia

  A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z | 0-9

All ArmMed Media material is provided for information only and is neither advice nor a substitute for proper medical care. Consult a qualified healthcare professional who understands your particular history for individual concerns.