Corticosteroids overdose

Definition 
Poisoning from an overdose of corticosteroids.

Poisonous Ingredient 

     
  • Alclometasone dipropionate  
  • Amcinonide  
  • Augmented betamethasone dipropionate  
  • Beclomethasone dipropionate  
  • Betamethasone  
  • Betamethasone benzoate  
  • Betamethasone dipropionate  
  • Betamethasone sodium phosphate  
  • Betamethasone valerate  
  • Clobetasol propionate  
  • Clocortolone pivalate  
  • Cortisone  
  • Desonide  
  • Desoximetasone  
  • Dexamethasone  
  • Dexamethasone acetate  
  • Dexamethasone sodium phosphate  
  • Diflorasone acetonide  
  • Diflorasone diacetate  
  • Flunisolide  
  • Fluocinolone acetonide  
  • Fluocinonide  
  • Fluocinolone acetonide  
  • Flurandrenolide  
  • Fluticasone propionate  
  • Halcinonide  
  • Halobetasol propionate  
  • Hydrocortisone  
  • Hydrocortisone acetate  
  • Hydrocortisone butyrate  
  • Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate  
  • Hydrocortisone valerate  
  • Methylprednisolone  
  • Methylprednisolone acetate  
  • Methylprednisolone sodium succinate  
  • Mometasone furoate  
  • Prednisolone acetate  
  • Prednisolone sodium phosphate  
  • Prednisolone tebutate  
  • Prednisone  
  • Triamcinolone  
  • Triamcinolone acetonide  
  • Triamcinolone diacetate  
  • Triamcinolone hexacetonide

Note: This list may not be all inclusive.

Where Found 

     
  • Alclometasone dipropionate (Delonal)  
  • Augmented betamethasone dipropionate (Deprolene)  
  • Beclomethasone dipropionate (Diprosone)  
  • Betamethasone sodium phosphate (Celestone)  
  • Betamethasone valerate (Valisone)  
  • Clobetasol propionate (Temovate)  
  • Clocortolone pivalate (Cloderm)  
  • Desonide (DesOwen, Tridesilon)  
  • Desoximetasone (Topicort)  
  • Dexamethasone (Decadron)  
  • Fluocinonide (Lidex)  
  • Flunisolide (AeroBid)  
  • Fluocinolone acetonide (Synalar)  
  • Flurandrenolide (Cordran)  
  • Fluticasone propionate (Cutivate)  
  • Halcinonide (Halog)  
  • Hydrocortisone (Cortef)  
  • Hydrocortisone sodium phosphate (Solu-Cortef)  
  • Hydrocortisone valerate (Westcort)  
  • Methylprednisolone (Medrol)  
  • Methylprednisolone sodium succinate (Solu-Medrol)  
  • Mometasone furoate (Elocon)  
  • Prednisolone sodium phosphate (Pred Fonte)  
  • Prednisone (Deltasone)  
  • Triamcinolone acetonide (Aristocort)

Note: This list may not be all inclusive.

Symptoms 

     
  • Swelling in lower legs, ankles, or feet  
  • Nervousness  
  • Sleepiness  
  • Depression  
  • Discontinuation of the menstrual cycles  
  • Weakness  
  • Worsening of disease state such as ulcers, diabetes  
  • Deafness  
  • Itching skin  
  • Burning skin  
  • Dry skin  
  • Hypertension (high blood pressure)  
  • Convulsions  
  • Muscle weakness  
  • Psychosis

Home Treatment 

DO NOT INDUCE VOMITING unless instructed to do so by Poison Control or by a physician.

If instructed to induce vomiting, proceed as follows or as otherwise instructed:

     
  • Give the appropriate dose of ipecac syrup: 15 milliliters (ml) or 1 TABLEspoonful for children and 30 ml (2 TABLEspoonsful) for an adult.  
  • Follow with 1/2 glass or 4 ounces (oz.) of water for children or 8 to 12 oz. of water for adults.  
  • Repeat 1 more time in 1/2 hour if vomiting has not occurred.

Before Calling Emergency 

Determine the following information:

     
  • The patient’s age, weight, and condition  
  • The name of the product (ingredients and strengths if known)  
  • When it was swallowed  
  • The amount swallowed

Poison Control, or a local emergency number 
If you are concerned about corticosteroid overdose, seek emergency medical care immediately at your nearest emergency room. See Poison Control centers for telephone numbers and addresses. Take any containers with you to the emergency room.

What to expect at the emergency room 

Some or all of the following procedures may be performed:

     
  • Treatment of symptoms  
  • Pumping the stomach (gastric lavage)  
  • Giving activated charcoal  
  • Monitoring vital signs ( including blood pressure and pulse)

Expectations (prognosis) 
One-time ingestion of a corticosteroid product is usually benign, requiring no therapy. Most symptoms are associated with long-term therapeutic use of these drugs.

Johns Hopkins patient information

Last revised: December 6, 2012
by Simon D. Mitin, M.D.

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All ArmMed Media material is provided for information only and is neither advice nor a substitute for proper medical care. Consult a qualified healthcare professional who understands your particular history for individual concerns.