Anastomosis

Definition
An anastomosis is a surgical connection between two structures. It most commonly refers to a connection which is created between tubular structures, such as blood vessels or loops of intestine. For example, when a segment of intestine is surgically removed, the two remaining ends are sewn or stapled together (anastomosed), and the procedure is referred to as an intestinal anastomosis.

Information
Examples of surgical anastomoses are colostomy (an opening created between the bowel and the abdominal skin) and arterio-venous fistula (an opening created between an artery and vein) for Hemodialysis.

A pathological anastomosis can result from trauma or disease and may involve veins, arteries, or intestines. These are usually referred to as fistulas. In the cases of veins or arteries, traumatic fistulas usually occur between artery and vein. Traumatic intestinal fistulas usually occur between two loops of intestine (enetero-enteric fistula) or intestine and skin (enterocutaneous fistula).

Johns Hopkins patient information

Last revised: December 6, 2012
by Dave R. Roger, M.D.

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