Soya may cure fatty liver

A diet rich in soy protein may alleviate fatty liver, a disease that often accompanies diabetes, says a study.

Nimbe Torres, a medical researcher affiliated with the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion in Mexico, investigated the effects of a diet high in soy protein on the development of fatty liver associated with diabetes.

She fed diabetic fatty rats that develop hyperinsulinemia and hepatic steatosis a diet of soy protein for 160 days.

She found that the consumption of soy protein prevented the accumulation of triglycerides and cholesterol in the liver despite the development of obesity and hyperinsulinemia in the rats, reports the science portal “Eurek Alert”.

“We also observed that the effects of soy protein were due to a low expression of genes involved in the synthesis of fatty acids and triglycerides in the liver,” explained Torres.

“These changes were due to a reduction in the transcription factors that control the expression of genes involved in lipid production.”

In addition, levels of a transcription factor, which controls genes involved in fatty acid breakdown as well as its target genes, were increased in rats that were fed soy protein.

Thus, feeding rats a soy-rich diet reduced the amount of fatty acid in their liver by not only reducing lipid production but also by increasing its breakdown.

The high levels of insulin and insulin-resistance that accompany diabetes are often associated with fatty liver or hepatic steatosis, an untreatable condition that can lead to chronic liver disease and death.

In this condition, large lipid-filled compartments accumulate in the cells of the liver due to an increase in production of fatty acids in it. The result is an enlarged liver.

Although further research is needed, Torres believes that consuming soy protein could very well reduce insulin resistance, renal damage and fat production.

Provided by ArmMed Media
Revision date: July 5, 2011
Last revised: by Tatiana Kuznetsova, D.M.D.