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You are here : Health.am > Health Centers > Mental Health > Mental Disorders > Mood disorders > Hypomanic Episode

Hypomanic Episode

Hypomanic Episode

Hypomanic Episode

Episode Features

A Hypomanic Episode is defined as a distinct period during which there is an abnormally and persistently elevated, expansive, or irritable mood that lasts at least 4 days (Criterion A). This period of abnormal mood must be accompanied by at least three additional symptoms from a list that includes inflated self-esteem or grandiosity (nondelusional), decreased need for sleep, pressure of speech, flight of ideas, distractibility, increased involvement in goal-directed activities or psychomotor agitation, and excessive involvement in pleasurable activities that have a high potential for painful consequences (Criterion B). If the mood is irritable rather than elevated or expansive, at least four of the above symptoms must be present. This list of additional symptoms is identical to those that define a Manic Episode except that delusions or hallucinations cannot be present.

The mood during a Hypomanic Episode must be clearly different from the individual's usual nondepressed mood, and there must be a clear change in functioning that is not characteristic of the individual's usual functioning (Criterion C). Because the changes in mood and functioning must be observable by others (Criterion D), the evaluation of this criterion will often require interviewing other informants (e.g., family members). History from other informants is particularly important in the evaluation of adolescents. In contrast to a Manic Episode, a Hypomanic Episode is not severe enough to cause marked impairment in social or occupational functioning or to require hospitalization, and there are no psychotic features (Criterion E). The change in functioning for some individuals may take the form of a marked increase in efficiency, accomplishments, or creativity. However, for others, hypomania can cause some social or occupational impairment.

The mood disturbance and other symptoms must not be due to the direct physiological effects of a drug of abuse, a medication, other treatment for depression (electroconvulsive therapy or light therapy), or toxin exposure. The episode must also not be due to the direct physiological effects of a general medical condition (e.g., multiple sclerosis, brain tumor) (Criterion F).

Symptoms like those seen in a Hypomanic Episode may be due to the direct effects of antidepressant medication, electroconvulsive therapy, light therapy, or medication prescribed for other general medical conditions (e.g., corticosteroids). Such presentations are not considered Hypomanic Episodes and do not count toward the diagnosis of Bipolar II Disorder. For example, if a person with recurrent Major Depressive Disorder develops symptoms of a hypomanic-like episode during a course of antidepressant medication, the episode is diagnosed as a Substance-Induced Mood Disorder, With Manic Features, and there is no switch from a diagnosis of Major Depressive Disorder to Bipolar II Disorder. Some evidence suggests that there may be a bipolar "diathesis" in individuals who develop manic- or hypomanic-like episodes following somatic treatment for depression. Such individuals may have an increased likelihood of future Manic or Hypomanic Episodes that are not related to substances or somatic treatments for depression.

Mood Disorders

Schizophrenia and Other Psychotic Disorders

The elevated mood in a Hypomanic Episode is described as euphoric, unusually good, cheerful, or high. Although the person's mood may have an infectious quality for the uninvolved observer, it is recognized as a distinct change from the usual self by those who know the person well. The expansive quality of the mood disturbance is characterized by enthusiasm for social, interpersonal, or occupational interactions. Although elevated mood is considered prototypical, the mood disturbance may be irritable or may alternate between euphoria and irritability. Characteristically, inflated self-esteem, usually at the level of uncritical self-confidence rather than marked grandiosity, is present (Criterion B1). There is very often a decreased need for sleep (Criterion B2); the person awakens before the usual time with increased energy. The speech of a person with a Hypomanic Episode is often somewhat louder and more rapid than usual, but is not typically difficult to interrupt. It may be full of jokes, puns, plays on words, and irrelevancies (Criterion B3). Flight of ideas is uncommon and, if present, lasts for very brief periods (Criterion B4).

Distractibility is often present, as evidenced by rapid changes in speech or activity as a result of responding to various irrelevant external stimuli (Criterion B5). The increase in goal-directed activity may involve planning of, and participation in, multiple activities (Criterion B6). These activities are often creative and productive (e.g., writing a letter to the editor, clearing up paperwork). Sociability is usually increased, and there may be an increase in sexual activity. There may be impulsive activity such as buying sprees, reckless driving, or foolish business investments (Criterion B7). However, such activities are usually organized, are not bizarre, and do not result in the level of impairment that is characteristic of a Manic Episode.

Associated Features and Disorders

Associated features of a Hypomanic Episode are similar to those for a Manic Episode. Mood may also be characterized as dysphoric if irritable or depressive symptoms are more prominent than euphoria in the clinical presentation.

Specific Culture and Age Features

Cultural considerations that were suggested for Major Depressive Episodes are relevant to Hypomanic Episodes as well. In younger (e.g., adolescent) persons, Hypomanic Episodes may be associated with school truancy, antisocial behavior, school failure, or substance use.

Course

A Hypomanic Episode typically begins suddenly, with a rapid escalation of symptoms within a day or two. Episodes may last for several weeks to months and are usually more abrupt in onset and briefer than Major Depressive Episodes. In many cases, the Hypomanic Episode may be preceded or followed by a Major Depressive Episode. Studies suggest that 5%-15% of individuals with hypomania will ultimately develop a Manic Episode.

Differential Diagnosis

A Hypomanic Episode must be distinguished from a Mood Disorder Due to a General Medical Condition. The diagnosis is Mood Disorder Due to a General Medical Condition if the mood disturbance is judged to be the direct physiological consequence of a specific general medical condition (e.g., multiple sclerosis, brain tumor, Cushing's syndrome). This determination is based on the history, laboratory findings, or physical examination. If it is judged that the hypomanic symptoms are not the direct physiological consequence of the general medical condition, then the primary Mood Disorder is recorded on Axis I (e.g., Bipolar II Disorder) and the general medical condition is recorded on Axis III (e.g., myocardial infarction).

A Substance-Induced Mood Disorder is distinguished from a Hypomanic Episode by the fact that a substance (e.g., a drug of abuse, a medication, or exposure to a toxin) is judged to be etiologically related to the mood disturbance. Symptoms like those seen in a Hypomanic Episode may be precipitated by a drug of abuse (e.g., hypomanic symptoms that occur only in the context of intoxication with cocaine would be diagnosed as Cocaine-Induced Mood Disorder, With Manic Features, With Onset During Intoxication). Symptoms like those seen in a Hypomanic Episode may also be precipitated by antidepressant treatment such as medication, electroconvulsive therapy, or light therapy. Such episodes are also diagnosed as Substance-Induced Mood Disorders (e.g., Amitriptyline-Induced Mood Disorder, With Manic Features; Electroconvulsive Therapy-Induced Mood Disorder, With Manic Features). However, clinical judgment is essential to determine whether the treatment is truly causal or whether a primary Hypomanic Episode happened to have its onset while the person was receiving the treatment.

Manic Episodes should be distinguished from Hypomanic Episodes. Although Manic Episodes and Hypomanic Episodes have identical lists of characteristic symptoms, the mood disturbance in Hypomanic Episodes is not sufficiently severe to cause marked impairment in social or occupational functioning or to require hospitalization. Some Hypomanic Episodes may evolve into full Manic Episodes.

Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and a Hypomanic Episode are both characterized by excessive activity, impulsive behavior, poor judgment, and denial of problems. Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder is distinguished from a Hypomanic Episode by its characteristic early onset (i.e., before age 7 years), chronic rather than episodic course, lack of relatively clear onsets and offsets, and the absence of abnormally expansive or elevated mood.

A Hypomanic Episode must be distinguished from euthymia, particularly in individuals who have been chronically depressed and are unaccustomed to the experience of a nondepressed mood state.

Criteria for Hypomanic Episode

A. A distinct period of persistently elevated, expansive, or irritable mood, lasting throughout at least 4 days, that is clearly different from the usual nondepressed mood.

B. During the period of mood disturbance, three (or more) of the following symptoms have persisted (four if the mood is only irritable) and have been present to a significant degree:

(1) inflated self-esteem or grandiosity
(2) decreased need for sleep (e.g., feels rested after only 3 hours of sleep)
(3) more talkative than usual or pressure to keep talking
(4) flight of ideas or subjective experience that thoughts are racing
(5) distractibility (i.e., attention too easily drawn to unimportant or irrelevant external stimuli)
(6) increase in goal-directed activity (either socially, at work or school, or sexually) or psychomotor agitation
(7) excessive involvement in pleasurable activities that have a high potential for painful consequences (e.g., the person engages in unrestrained buying sprees, sexual indiscretions, or foolish business investments)

C. The episode is associated with an unequivocal change in functioning that is uncharacteristic of the person when not symptomatic.

D. The disturbance in mood and the change in functioning are observable by others.

E. The episode is not severe enough to cause marked impairment in social or occupational functioning, or to necessitate hospitalization, and there are no psychotic features.

F. The symptoms are not due to the direct physiological effects of a substance (e.g., a drug of abuse, a medication, or other treatment) or a general medical condition (e.g., hyperthyroidism).

Note: Hypomanic-like episodes that are clearly caused by somatic antidepressant treatment (e.g., medication, electroconvulsive therapy, light therapy) should not count toward a diagnosis of Bipolar II Disorder.

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